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9/11 Community FAQs

FAQs

VOICES is available to assist you with resources, referrals, support and educational opportunities. Frequently asked questions can assist your search.

 

Responder FAQs

What is a Responder?

A responder is anyone who on 9/11 and in the months that followed (July 2002) responded ,worked or volunteered in the NYC disaster zone (WTC Health Program and Victim Compensations Fund have slightly different geographical boundaries).
 

Is there counseling available?

VOICES offers several support opportunities through in person education events, webinars, small discussion groups as well as virtual support groups.
 

Can I get free admission to the 9/11 museum?

Responders can get free admission to the 9/11 museum, one needs to register with the Museum Registry, additionally there are several community nights throughout the year offering free admission to the entire 9/11 community. Learn more.
 

If I am not sick should I register with the VCF?

By registering with the VCF you are preserving your right to make a claim in the future should you become ill from 9/11 certified conditions and diseases.
 

What is the Memorial Glade?

In the aftermath of the 2001 terrorist attacks, tens of thousands of men and women from across the nation and around the world responded.
 
Facing a mountainous landscape of mangled and jagged steel at Ground Zero, and despite fires that burned for 100 days, rescuers and recovery workers toiled night and day for nine months. What began as a rescue operation turned into the grim work of recovering those who had been killed. Workers also had to remove nearly two million tons of debris. Through sheer determination, they paved the way for rebuilding. Their sacrifice would be met with suffering.
 
On the day of the attacks and throughout the recovery, hundreds of thousands—responders and survivors, workers and residents—were exposed to hazards and toxins in the air at and around the World Trade Center site, resulting in chronic illnesses and the deaths of thousands. Responders and workers at all three attack sites, including the Pentagon and in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, have been affected. For the injured, sick, and dying, and for their families and friends, 9/11 has remained an all-too-present reality.
 
The 9/11 Memorial Glade is dedicated in their honor: https://911memorial.org/visit/memorial/memorial-glade
 
 

Survivor FAQs

What is a Survivor?

Worked, caught in the dust cloud, lived, attended school, childcare, or adult day care. Worked in various forms cleanup which exposed person to extensive WTC dust within the NYC Disaster Area (south of canal street).
 

Can I get free admission to the 9/11 museum?

Complimentary tickets are available to the two community nights, May 30th and September 10th.
 

If I am not sick should I register with the VCF?

By registering with the VCF you are preserving your right to make a claim in the future should you get sick with a 9/11 certified condition. If you are presently sick and not already registered with the WTCHP you have limited time to register existing injuries for compensation, see www.vcf.gov.
 

Are there peer to peer or other support groups just for survivors available?

VOICES hosts support groups and discussion groups specifically for survivors an throughout the year as well as additional programming. Please see our calendar or email support@voicesofsept11.org
 

Am I taxed on the VCF settlement?

The “Victims of Terrorism Tax Relief Act of 2001” provides that payments for the VCF are tax exempt – consult with a professional regarding asny Disability Payments see tax relief ( need to put somewhere on web site but not sure where – perhaps a place of legal docs?
 

What is the 9/11 Memorial Museum Registry for Witnesses and Survivors?

The Witnesses and Survivors Registry documents firsthand experiences of the 9/11 attacks and the World Trade Center bombing on February 26, 1993. This registry also provides a way for witnesses and survivors to interact as a community. If you were in close proximity to the sites of the attacks, or if you consider yourself a survivor for another reason, we welcome you to join the registry.
 

Can I get help applying to the WTCHP?

Voices is available to help you through the applications process call our office or email you questions to support@voicesofsept11.org.
 

Can I submit my story to the Living Memorial?

Yes, please contact the office to arrange a time to speak.
 

What is the Memorial Glade?

In the aftermath of the 2001 terrorist attacks, tens of thousands of men and women from across the nation and around the world responded.
 
Facing a mountainous landscape of mangled and jagged steel at Ground Zero, and despite fires that burned for 100 days, rescuers and recovery workers toiled night and day for nine months. What began as a rescue operation turned into the grim work of recovering those who had been killed. Workers also had to remove nearly two million tons of debris. Through sheer determination, they paved the way for rebuilding. Their sacrifice would be met with suffering.
 
On the day of the attacks and throughout the recovery, hundreds of thousands—responders and survivors, workers and residents—were exposed to hazards and toxins in the air at and around the World Trade Center site, resulting in chronic illnesses and the deaths of thousands. Responders and workers at all three attack sites, including the Pentagon and in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, have been affected. For the injured, sick, and dying, and for their families and friends, 9/11 has remained an all-too-present reality.
 
The 9/11 Memorial Glade is dedicated in their honor: https://911memorial.org/visit/memorial/memorial-glade
 

What is the Survivor Tree?

The Memorial plaza at the 9/11 Memorial includes one Callery pear tree. In October 2001, recovery workers discovered the severely damaged tree at Ground Zero. Members of the New York City Parks and Recreation Department removed it from the site and nursed it back to health. Having survived the events of 9/11, the tree became known as the Survivor Tree. It was returned to the World Trade Center site in 2010 and now stands on the plaza as a symbol of resilience and perseverance.
 

Where can I find the Survivor Staircase?

Relocated within the museum it is on the lower level as you descend towards bedrock. The Survivors' Staircase was the last visible remaining original structure above ground level at the World Trade Center site. It was originally two outdoor flights of granite-clad stairs and an escalator that connected Vesey Street to the World Trade Center' Plaza. During the September 11 attacks, the stairs served as an escape route for hundreds of evacuees.
 
 

Families FAQs

What is a Family Member?

A family member is anyone in the immediate family or extended family of a loved one who was killed in the terrorist attack on September 11, 2001 or the February 26th, 1993 bombing at the WTC.
 

Can I still add photographs and personal remembrances on the Living Memorial?

The Living Memorial will always accept additional input by family members and friends to commemorate the lives lost. For more information, email us at support@voicesofsept11.org.
 

Can I get free admission to the 9/11 Museum?

Complimentary tickets are available to family members however a reservation is requested. There is a separate admission line and ticket window for families for more information familyvisits@911memorial.org.
 

What is the Family Room at the Museum?

The Family Room, located on the Atrium Terrace level of the Museum Pavilion, provides a private place of comfort and reflection for 9/11 family members and their guests.
 

How do I visit the Reflections Room and Repository at the Museum?

The repository for the remains of 9/11 victims under the jurisdiction of the Office of Chief Medical Examiner of the City of New York (OCME) is located at bedrock at the World Trade Center site. The repository provides a dignified and reverential setting for the unidentified and unclaimed remains of the World Trade Center victims as identifications continue to be made. The repository is separate from the public space of the 9/11 Memorial Museum. To arrange a visit to the Reflection Room at the repository, please contact the OCME at (212) 447-7884.
 

Are there peer to peer or other support groups just for family members available?

VOICES hosts support groups and discussion groups specifically for family members throughout the year as well as additional programming. Please call for email support@voicesofsept11.org.
 

Am I taxed on the VCF and other settlements?

The “Victims of Terrorism Tax Relief Act of 2001” provides that payments for the VCF are tax exempt – consult with a professional regarding payments you may have received form the original fund or from the subsequent law suits see tax relief.
 

What is the 9/11 Memorial Museum Registry for Memorials?

The Memorials Registry tracks 9/11 memorials throughout the world. It is a testament to the global impact of 9/11 and the diverse ways in which individuals and communities have continued to commemorate the victims and remember the attacks. Learn More.
 

Can I get help applying to the WTCHP?

Voices is available to help you through the applications process call our office or email you questions to support@voicesofsept11.org
 

Can I submit my story to the Living Memorial?

Yes, please contact the office to arrange a time to speak.
 

What is the Survivor Tree?

The Memorial plaza at the 9/11 Memorial includes one Callery pear tree. In October 2001, recovery workers discovered the severely damaged tree at Ground Zero. Members of the New York City Parks and Recreation Department removed it from the site and nursed it back to health. Having survived the events of 9/11, the tree became known as the Survivor Tree. It was returned to the World Trade Center site in 2010 and now stands on the plaza as a symbol of resilience and perseverance.
 

Where can I find the Survivor Staircase?

Relocated within the museum it is on the lower level as you descend towards bedrock. The Survivors' Staircase was the last visible remaining original structure above ground level at the World Trade Center site. It was originally two outdoor flights of granite-clad stairs and an escalator that connected Vesey Street to the World Trade Center' Plaza. During the September 11 attacks, the stairs served as an escape route for hundreds of evacuees.